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Handbooks of the Higgs Cross Section Working Group (HXSWG)

Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 2. Differential Distributions

S. Dittmaier, S. Dittmaier, C. Mariotti, G. Passarino, R. Tanaka, S. Alekhin, J. Alwall, E.A. Bagnaschi, A. Banfi, J. Blumlein et al.

Jan 2012 - 275 pages

CERN-2012-002 e-Print: arXiv:1201.3084 [hep-ph]

Abstract: This Report summarises the results of the second year's activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group. The main goal of the working group was to present the state of the art of Higgs Physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first working group report Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 1. Inclusive Observables (CERN-2011-002) focuses on predictions (central values and errors) for total Higgs production cross sections and Higgs branching ratios in the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension, covering also related issues such as Monte Carlo generators, parton distribution functions, and pseudo-observables. This second Report represents the next natural step towards realistic predictions upon providing results on cross sections with benchmark cuts, differential distributions, details of specific decay channels, and further recent developments.

Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 3. Higgs Properties

The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group Collaboration (S. Heinemeyer et al.)

Jul 4, 2013 - 404 pages

e-Print: arXiv:1307.1347 [hep-ph]

Abstract: This Report summarizes the results of the activities in 2012 and the first half of 2013 of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group. The main goal of the working group was to present the state of the art of Higgs Physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. This report follows the first working group report Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 1. Inclusive Observables (CERN-2011-002) and the second working group report Handbook of LHC Higgs Cross Sections: 2. Differential Distributions (CERN-2012-002). After the discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC in mid-2012 this report focuses on refined prediction of Standard Model (SM) Higgs phenomenology around the experimentally observed value of 125-126 GeV, refined predictions for heavy SM-like Higgs bosons as well as predictions in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and first steps to go beyond these models. The other main focus is on the extraction of the characteristics and properties of the newly discovered particle such as couplings to SM particles, spin and CP-quantum numbers etc.

Technical notes

Benchmark scenarios for low tanβ in the MSSM

Emanuele Bagnaschi (DESY) , Felix Frensch (KIT, Karlsruhe) , Sven Heinemeyer (Cantabria Inst. of Phys.) , Gabriel Lee (Technion) , Stefan Rainer Liebler (DESY) , Milada Muhlleitner (KIT, Karlsruhe) , Allison Renae Mc Carn (Michigan U.) , Jeremie Quevillon (King's Coll. London) , Nikolaos Rompotis (Seattle U.) , Pietro Slavich (Paris, LPTHE) et al

Aug 1, 2015 - 24 pages

e-print: LHCHXSWG-2015-002

Abstract The run-1 data taken at the LHC in 2011 and 2012 have led to strong constraints on the allowed parameter space of the MSSM. These are imposed by the discovery of an approximately SM-like Higgs boson with a mass of 125.09±0.24 ~GeV and by the non-observation of SUSY particles or of additional (neutral or charged) Higgs bosons. For low values of the parameter tanβ, the direct bounds on the masses of the additional Higgs bosons are still relatively weak, but very heavy SUSY particles are required to reproduce the observed mass of the SM-like Higgs boson. In this document we discuss and compare two approaches for predicting the properties of the Higgs bosons in the region with low tanβ and heavy SUSY. We also make recommendations for the sets of parameters to be used by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations in the analysis of such scenarios.